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  LiveWire / Teen Forums / Politics & Government / Viewing Topic

What is your political affiliation? (Political Compass)
Replies: 185Last Post Oct. 6, 2015 8:27pm by Twilight Fever
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iconoclast


is this real

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my results are amusing, because im more of a cold rationalist than an idealist. i dont care if something is right/left or whatever as long as it works


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well, is it?

6:44 am on Feb. 4, 2012 | Joined: April 2005 | Days Active: 1,006
Join to learn more about iconoclast Pennsylvania, United States | GLBT Ally Male | Posts: 46,163 | Points: 52,895
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Savior


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Quote: from Bud2400 at 6:38 pm on Feb. 3, 2012

Quote: from Savior at 1:45 pm on Jan. 26, 2012

I like this thread because it lets me know which people on Livewire are terrible people.

What exactly would be your dividing line between who's a good person and who's a bad person? What number?


Hm. Over +5 on economics.

Over -5 on authoritarian. Maybe a wiggle room of 1 square extra on authoritarian.

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11:12 pm on Feb. 7, 2012 | Joined: April 2008 | Days Active: 812
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the real anti christ


PECKING ORDER!

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Economic Left/Right: 1.62
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -1.79  

Overall I didn't like the wording of a lot of the questions. I understood what they wanted to gain from it but it was very ambiguous to me. For example, in the questions where they ask about corporate regulations they asked if you thought corporations had the best interest of people at heart instead of asking if you are for x kind of regulations.

For me I would say no they don't have the intrest of the common person in mind however no I don't agree with most kinds of regulations.

Post edited at 7:35 pm on Feb. 9, 2012 by the real anti christ

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7:32 pm on Feb. 9, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2002 | Days Active: 2,367
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RandomThought


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Economic Left/Right: -3.38
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.67

Not sure what good this does, I don't think that the wording of the questions is particularly well formulated.


4:21 am on Feb. 13, 2012 | Joined: Nov. 2010 | Days Active: 1,148
Join to learn more about RandomThought England, United Kingdom | Straight Male | Posts: 8,295 | Points: 20,474
( Bud2400  )


skeet skeet skeet

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After having plotted 50 people, here are some interesting (and fairly obvious) observations:

- Almost everyone scores on the bottom half (90%).  This is perhaps why topics on things like gay marriage usually get little traction here - because most of us, whether on the right or left, will agree except on some minor details.  There isn't a lot of discussion to be had.  This may be the result of the fact that most people here are in their teens or early 20s (older people tend to score further up).

- With the above, the real dividing line between us is on economics (54% of everyone is on the left half, 46% on the right half).

- Despite all that, the people who score further right tend to be slightly more socially conservative (or up) than those who score further left (you'll notice if you were to draw a circle around the main crowd, it would be in a diagonal direction, from bottom left to top right).  Maybe that's a result of people further right being more closely affiliated with right wing politics in general?

- While there are 10% fewer people on the bottom right than bottom left, it appears more crowded on the bottom right. It seems few cross the +5 line on economics and consequently most on the bottom right are penned in a small area, whereas on the bottom left people are spread out more.  This may be why libertarians seem like they have such a large presence here - being closer together, when it comes to economics and social policy discussions, they would reinforce their ideas better than those on the bottom left who might be more prone to be divided amongst themselves being so spread out.

- This tells you nothing about peoples' positions on foreign policy.  You'll notice people who are more interventionist fall close to people who are very non-interventionist.

- This also tells you little on peoples' perspectives in general, how they approach an issue.  It is good as a general indication of where people stand on economics and perhaps on social policy (though we can assume most on Livewire are relatively progressive on social issues), but beyond that it can vary quite a bit.  For example, I fall close to FA but I find myself arguing with her about as much as anyone on the bottom left.

Post edited at 11:00 pm on Feb. 14, 2012 by Bud2400

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12:07 pm on Feb. 14, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2004 | Days Active: 2,566
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allsmiles


nodnoL 871 selim

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Yea, it's okay for generalisation but I'm sure I'm not the only one who has blips that would shove them further along or back (how would you say this avoiding the left/right dichotomy?) in either axis, either moderately or severely.

EDIT: I just redid the test because I decided to do this for another community I'm a member of, and I've shifted a fair bit. I'm now...


Economic Left/Right: 3.75
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.18

...which lands me in Libertarian. I wouldn't normally have posted but I think that's quite significant. Still don't really like the political compass test, though...

Post edited at 12:45 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 by allsmiles

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5:53 am on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Aug. 2007 | Days Active: 1,574
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skeet skeet skeet

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Quote: from allsmiles at 5:53 am on Feb. 15, 2012

Yea, it's okay for generalisation but I'm sure I'm not the only one who has blips that would shove them further along or back (how would you say this avoiding the left/right dichotomy?) in either axis, either moderately or severely.

Yeah, I find I shift around on the test too a bit, but not usually that much.  I almost always remain between +2 and +4 on the economy and -4 and -6 on social issues.

It is kinda interesting if you track your previous scores on it.  Back in 2008, I was typically scoring around +4, -4 and back in 2005, I was scoring around -4, -4.  Now, when I took it in 2011, I was at +3, -5.88.  You can clearly see some evolution in my political stance over the years, where I did a full revision on my economic thinking and swung far to the right, and then receded a bit over the last few years but became more socially progressive.


EDIT: I just redid the test because I decided to do this for another community I'm a member of, and I've shifted a fair bit. I'm now...


Economic Left/Right: 3.75
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.18

...which lands me in Libertarian. I wouldn't normally have posted but I think that's quite significant. Still don't really like the political compass test, though...


Alright, I'll update it.

The test clearly isn't perfect, but it does work well enough to give a general impression of where you land as far as economic and social issues go.

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12:59 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2004 | Days Active: 2,566
Join to learn more about Bud2400 Washington, United States | Straight Male | Posts: 18,541 | Points: 46,548
allsmiles


nodnoL 871 selim

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Yea, the first few times I took the test I always wound up around -4,-3. I didn't take it for a while and now I've started taking it again I've reflected my x score.

The big problem I have with the test is that the ones that question social conservatism don't really apply to people of my age in my continent. The legislative concept of denying homosexuals or areligious people equal privileges is alien, certainly in the UK, if not all of western Europe, and haven't since before I was born socially. It's tough to apply the word conservative to something when the conservative stance is to keep it in its liberal state.

Post edited at 1:04 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 by allsmiles

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When they leave me, they're all smiles.
When they leave you, they're in tears.


1:01 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Aug. 2007 | Days Active: 1,574
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skeet skeet skeet

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Quote: from allsmiles at 1:01 pm on Feb. 15, 2012

The big problem I have with the test is that the ones that question social conservatism don't really apply to people of my age in my continent. The legislative concept of denying homosexuals or areligious people equal privileges is alien, certainly in the UK, if not all of western Europe, and haven't since before I was born socially. It's tough to apply the word conservative to something when the conservative stance is to keep it in its liberal state.

The test is certainly very US-centric.  I don't know if other countries have the same security vs. freedom binary that we have here (which you see through the question about our liberties being curbed in the name of counter terrorism).

As far as non-religion goes though, I don't recall it saying something about denying them equal privileges as much as there was a question asking can an atheist be moral.  It's very common for a number of Christians here (particularly the most conservative ones) to believe that you absolutely need to be Christian to be a moral person, and it's a big reason why atheists are so distrusted here (hence why our politicians are so adamantly Christian, they don't want to be branded as atheist).

In any case, with your revised score, you're the 10th person into the libertarian space.  With 10 people total, or 20% of everyone, that makes libertarianism the most popular space lol.

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1:18 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2004 | Days Active: 2,566
Join to learn more about Bud2400 Washington, United States | Straight Male | Posts: 18,541 | Points: 46,548
allsmiles


nodnoL 871 selim

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Yea, I chose privileges instead of rights specifically because I thought it could apply to being considered moral. It's not my usual thoughtspace so I didn't know how to phrase it.

Another example I can give, I guess, is that there's only one politician in all of our government who (publicly) would be happy to see the NHS disbanded, and that's Daniel Hannan. Even then he only really has the balls to say it in the US, and I'm amazed he's still an MEP since he came out with it. The NHS is without doubt a very left organisation, but for all the complaints it gets I don't know a single person who would really say a bad word of it. Where the left and right differ here is on how to approach it. The Coalition is currently shifting responsibility and management away from administration onto GPs, as well as pushing to open up parts to competition (realistically, this is the Conservatives at work, not the Coalition). Labour, on the other hand, chose to increase budgets whilst uncharacteristically privatising parts of it that did not directly relate to healthcare, such as janitorial work.

In the US, both of those stances would be deemed hard left, because there exists a socialised medicine institution. In the UK, there are very few alive who lived in a time without it, so in my eyes our politics has shifted to encompass it in the right as well as the left.

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When they leave you, they're in tears.


1:30 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Aug. 2007 | Days Active: 1,574
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skeet skeet skeet

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Quote: from allsmiles at 1:30 pm on Feb. 15, 2012

Yea, I chose privileges instead of rights specifically because I thought it could apply to being considered moral. It's not my usual thoughtspace so I didn't know how to phrase it.

Ah okay, I get what you mean.  I don't necessarily think of it as a privilege because I believe you can honestly think that but still hold positions that wouldn't actively discriminate against atheists.  I interpret the question more as one if you're culturally conservative or not, as that would mainly have a reflection on your personal life.


In the US, both of those stances would be deemed hard left, because there exists a socialised medicine institution. In the UK, there are very few alive who lived in a time without it, so in my eyes our politics has shifted to encompass it in the right as well as the left.

Yeah I know.  Personally, I support things like universal healthcare, but I still get a +3 score on economics.  If it's just one or a couple things, it won't force you to the left side on that scale.  Doesn't your conservative party support things like reducing financial aid for tuition for university students?  When it's supporting all things on the right except universal healthcare, you're still on the right on the whole.

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1:37 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2004 | Days Active: 2,566
Join to learn more about Bud2400 Washington, United States | Straight Male | Posts: 18,541 | Points: 46,548
allsmiles


nodnoL 871 selim

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It's not quite like that re: higher education. What's happened is that they've stopped subsidising the qualifications. However, they still loan the full tuition fee as well as a maintenance loan for students to get by. Also, rather than paying back at a rate of 3% of income above 15,000, they will now be paying back at the same rate for income over 21,000 (I believe there's another band around 40k that's 9% but I'm not sure). It actually works out better for the students, because unless they're earning well above average income they're better off than they would have been before, especially since student loans don't affect your credit rating and aren't considered true debt (if you can't pay it back it's written off).

Of course, the students' knee jerk reaction was "Triple tuition fees, no bloody way!" and they rioted without actually coming to understand what the implications of it all were.

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When they leave me, they're all smiles.
When they leave you, they're in tears.


2:23 pm on Feb. 15, 2012 | Joined: Aug. 2007 | Days Active: 1,574
Join to learn more about allsmiles England, United Kingdom | Male | Posts: 19,956 | Points: 36,837
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skeet skeet skeet

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Quote: from allsmiles at 2:23 pm on Feb. 15, 2012

It's not quite like that re: higher education. What's happened is that they've stopped subsidising the qualifications. However, they still loan the full tuition fee as well as a maintenance loan for students to get by. Also, rather than paying back at a rate of 3% of income above 15,000, they will now be paying back at the same rate for income over 21,000 (I believe there's another band around 40k that's 9% but I'm not sure). It actually works out better for the students, because unless they're earning well above average income they're better off than they would have been before, especially since student loans don't affect your credit rating and aren't considered true debt (if you can't pay it back it's written off).

Of course, the students' knee jerk reaction was "Triple tuition fees, no bloody way!" and they rioted without actually coming to understand what the implications of it all were.


Oh I see lol.  That actually isn't that bad, I can't believe people rioted like they did to that, but I guess the hysteria doesn't surprise me.

I wonder where KR is, I haven't heard from him for days.  He needs to update that chart.

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6:20 pm on Feb. 19, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2004 | Days Active: 2,566
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jimipop


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Economic Left/Right: -4.38
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -2.46

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7:51 pm on Feb. 19, 2012 | Joined: Mar. 2011 | Days Active: 514
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http://www.politicalcompass.org/uselection2012

Looks like the Political Compass site updated the candidates' results for the 2012 election and here's where they all fall:

This means Ron Paul falls under Libertarian Capitalism, Romney and Gingrich under Traditionalism, Obama under Conservatism, and Santorum under Fascism.

Compare that to 2008:

Ron Paul moved down a few points, Mitt Romney moved slightly right and slightly down, Gingrich slightly up, Santorum wasn't present on the 2008 one, but most notable is that Obama moved right and up by quite a lot.

Political Compass explains:

"This is a US election that defies logic and brings the nation closer towards a one-party state, masquerading as a two-party state.  

The Democratic incumbent has surrounded himself with conservative advisors and key figures many from previous administrations, and an unprecedented number from the Trilateral Commission. He also appointed a former Monsanto executive as Senior Advisor to the FDA. He has extended Bush tax cuts for the wealthy, presided over a spiralling rich-poor gap and sacrificed further American jobs with recent free trade deals.Trade union rights have also eroded under his watch. He has expanded Bush defence spending, droned civilians, failed to close Guantanamo, supported the NDAA which effectively legalises martial law, allowed drilling and adopted a soft-touch position towards the banks that is to the right of European Conservative leaders. We list these because many of Obama's detractors absurdly portray him as either a radical liberal or a socialist, while his apologists, equally absurdly, continue to view him as a well-intentioned progressive, tragically thwarted by overwhelming pressures. 2008's yes-we-can chanters, dazzled by pigment rather than policy detail, forgot to ask can what? Between 1998 and the last election, Obama amassed $37.6million from the financial services industry, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. While 2008 presidential candidate Obama appeared to champion universal health care, his first choice for Secretary of Health was a man who had spent years lobbying on behalf of the pharmaceutical industry against that very concept. Hey! You don't promise a successful pub, and then appoint the Salvation Army to run it. This time around, the honey-tongued President makes populist references to economic justice, while simultaneously appointing as his new Chief of Staff a former Citigroup executive concerned with hedge funds that bet on the housing market to collapse. Obama poses something of a challenge to The Political Compass, because he's a man of so few fixed principles."

As outrageous as it may appear, civil libertarians and human rights supporters would have actually fared better under a Republican administration. Had a Bush or McCain presidency continued Guantanamo and introduced the NDAA, the Democratic Party would have howled from the rooftops. Under a Democratic administration, these far-reaching developments have received scant opposition and a disgraceful absence of mainstream media coverage.  

Democratic and, especially, some Republican candidates, will benefit massively from new legislation that permits them to receive unlimited and unaccountable funding. This means a significant shift of political power to the very moneyed interests that earlier elections tried to contain. Super PACs will inevitably reshape the system and undermine democracy. It would be nave to suppose that a President Gingrich would feel no obligations towards his generous backer, Sheldon Adelson, one of the country's most influential men. Or a President Santorum towards billionaire mutual fund tycoon, Foster Freiss. Santorum emerges as the most authoritarian candidate, not the least for his extreme stand against abortion and condom sales. In our opinion, Romney, despite his consistent contempt for the impoverished, is correctly described as the weather vane candidate. He shares another similarity with Obama. His corporate-friendly health care plan for Massachusetts was strikingly similar to the President's "compromise" package. The emergence of the Tea Party enables an increasingly extreme GOP to present itself as middle-of-the road between an ultra right movement with "some good ideas that might go a bit too far" and, on the other side, a dangerous "socialist" president.

Since FDR, the mainstream American "Left" has been much more concerned with the social rather than the economic agenda. Identity politics; issues like peace, immigration, gay and women's rights, prayers in school have been of greater importance than matters like a minimum living wage . It's therefore understandable that many of them speak warmly about the most right wing of all the Republican contenders, Ron Paul. Paul is an extraordinary figure in this most extraordinary election. At 76, the sprightly, softly-spoken Congressman commands enormous youth enthusiasm and support across the spectrum - from Ralph Nader to the John Birch Society. Nader, who has spent decades campaigning for greater regulation of corporations, has somehow put his lot in with the most deregulatory of all the candidates. Many liberals appreciate Paul for his promise to bring the troops home, slash the defence budget and, among other things, his principled opposition to the NDAA. The harsh social Darwinism of Paul's core beliefs, however, appear to be of relatively little importance to such progressives. Similarly. his opposition to abortion and his support for creationism, which have endeared him to the Christian Coalition. Paul, the only conviction politician among them, no doubt enjoys a wider support base than the primary results suggest As the front-running three continue to bruise each other shadow boxing, he might yet emerge as the last man standing at the Convention. As president, Paul could be expected to reach widely beyond the Republicans in his appointments, further blurring party distinctions. While the liberal aspects of Paul's social policies are anathema to neo-cons, he remains the Republicans' best hope of achieving the presidency. Under a second term of Obama, however, the GOP can remain confident that it will continue to frame the debates."

Post edited at 11:51 pm on Feb. 23, 2012 by Bud2400

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11:46 pm on Feb. 23, 2012 | Joined: Dec. 2004 | Days Active: 2,566
Join to learn more about Bud2400 Washington, United States | Straight Male | Posts: 18,541 | Points: 46,548
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